I Have Devoted My Life to the Clitoris

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SKU: 9781939460073 Categories: ,
Author: Hall, Elizabeth
Publication Date: 08/01/2016
Publisher: Tarpaulin Sky Press
Binding: Paperback
Media: Book

Description

Literary Nonfiction. California Interest. LGBT Studies. Women’s Studies. Elizabeth Hall began writing I HAVE DEVOTED MY LIFE TO THE CLITORIS in the summer of 2010 after reading Thomas Laqueur’s Making Sex. She was particularly struck by Laqueur’s bold assertion: “More words have been shed, I suspect, about the clitoris, than about any other organ, or at least, any organ its size.” How was it possible that Hall had been reading compulsively for years and never once stumbled upon this trove of prose devoted to the clit? If Lacquer’s claim was correct, where were all these “words”? And more: what did size have to do with it? Hall set out to find all that had been written about the clit past and present. As she soon discovered, the history of the clitoris is no ordinary tale; rather, its history is marked by the act of forgetting.

“Marvelously researched and sculpted… Bulleted points rat-tat-tatting the patriarchy, strobing with pleasure.” Dodie Bellamy

“Freud, terra cotta cunts, hyenas, anatomists, and Acker, mixed with a certain slant of light on a windowsill and a leg thrown open invite us… Bawdy and beautiful.” Wendy C. Ortiz

“Gorgeous little book about a gorgeous little organ… Mines discourses as varied as sexology, plastic surgery, literature and feminism to produce an eye-opening compendium… The ‘tender button’ finally gets its due.” Janet Sarbanes

“God this book is glorious… You will learn and laugh and wonder why it took you so long to find this book.” Suzanne Scanlon

“The luxury of lingering in pleasure is what Hall’s book gives its readers, not only because the subject is at once sexy and scientifically compelling, but because it is rendered with graceful care, delivering in small bites an investigation of the clit that is simultaneously a meditation on the myriad ways in which smallness hides power.” The Rumpus